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Language - Set 1

Activities:

Let’s learn to understand and use words from these themes:

    • colours & shapes (e.g., blue, yellow, circle, square)
    • body (e.g., hand, leg, to clap, to walk)
    • clothing (e.g., shirt, pants, socks, shoes)
  • Point out colours and shapes in your house and neighbourhood. Play “I Spy” using colours and shapes as clues. For example, “I spy with my little eye something that is red.” Or “I spy with my little eye, something that is round.” (It’s an apple.) Encourage your child to find as many shapes and colours as possible by having him or her lead in the “I Spy” game as well.
  • Make a “Colour Book” where your child draws things of a certain colour on each page (e.g., on the “orange” page, you could have a pumpkin, a carrot and a goldfish). Help him or her label each page with the colour’s name.

Let’s learn to understand and use possessive adjectives (e.g., my, your, his, her).

  • Use possessive adjectives like his, her and your when talking about sharing. For example, “That is his soccer ball, but you can ask him to play in your yard with you.”
  • Use puppets to act out your own make-believe story about things that belong to different people.

Let’s learn to follow simple one-step instructions.

  • Give simple one-step instructions to your child. For example, “Please close the fridge door.”
  • Build a tower or puzzle together. Give your child simple instructions using descriptive words about an object’s colour or shapes to guide the building.
  • Play games like ‘Simon Says’ where the leader gives instructions such as ‘Simon says point to your nose’ and the other plays in the game make the action. Take turns so your child gets a chance to take the lead.

Can your child consistently:

  • Understand and use words from these themes:
    • colours & shapes (e.g., blue, yellow, circle, square)
    • body (e.g., hand, leg, to clap, to walk)
    • clothing (e.g., shirt, pants, socks, shoes)
  • Understand and use possessive adjectives (e.g., my, your, his, her).
  • Follow simple one-step instructions.

Did you know?

Having rich conversations relevant to your child’s everyday life is an important way to broaden his or her language skills (words, understanding, and ability to express themselves). Children need to hear a new word many times, and in many different situations in order to develop a deep understanding of it.