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Code - Set 7

Activities:

Let’s learn to replace a middle sound in a word.

  • When you see small words in a book, see if you and your child can change the middle sound to something else and make another real word. For example, pet could become pat, pit, pot or put.

Let’s learn to match uppercase and lowercase letters.

  • Play a matching game using uppercase and lowercase letters. For example, divide a sheet of paper into two sections, using one column for uppercase and one column for lowercase. Ask your child to connect pairs of letters with a line.

Let’s learn to sound out and spell:

  • One-syllable nonsense words (e.g., fip)
  • Two-syllable words that start with vowel-consonant and consonant-vowel-consonant (e.g., ever and never)
  • One-syllable words with consonant-vowel-consonant-consonant (e.g., ball)
  • One-syllable nonsense words with consonant-vowel-consonant-consonant (e.g., rith)
  • Pick a starting word such as ‘mop’. See how many words you can make by only switching one letter in the word at a time.

Can your child consistently:

  • Replace a middle sound in a word.
  • Match uppercase and lowercase letters.
  • Sound out and spell:
    • One-syllable nonsense words (e.g., fip)
    • Two-syllable words that start with vowel-consonant and consonant-vowel-consonant (e.g., ever and never)
    • One-syllable words with consonant-vowel-consonant-consonant (e.g., ball)
    • One-syllable nonsense words with consonant-vowel-consonant-consonant (e.g., rith)

Did you know?

Reading and writing are mutually reinforcing skills. Now is a great time to encourage your child to start writing and drawing in a journal. A couple of words a page are all that is needed. Encourage your child to write words based on how they sound (phonetic spelling). This is an important stage in reading and writing development. As your child’s understanding of the rules of written English develop, so will his or her spelling ability.