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Language - Set 6

Activities:

Let’s learn to understand and use words from these themes:

    • Daily routines (e.g., breakfast, lunch, supper, snack)
    • Playground (e.g., to swing, to slide, to climb, to skip)
    • Travel (e.g., car, truck boat, airplane).
  • When at the park together, make up obstacle course instructions for your child, naming each play structure and action. For example, you could say: “Go down the slide, climb the monkey bar ladder, then skip around the sandbox.”

Let’s learn to use a different voice to ask questions and make comments.

  • Use an exaggerated tone when reading questions in stories (e.g., “Who’s there?”), so your child can tell the difference between a question and a sentence. Talk about why we use questions (e.g., to get answers).

Let’s learn to understand and use the comparative (-er).

  • Compare similar objects using words with the -er suffix like bigger and faster. Your child has already learned about words that end with “-est” (e.g., biggest, fastest). You can now organize objects by comparing them (e.g., big, bigger, biggest).
  • The ‘-er’ ending is also often used to change a doing word (to build) to the name of someone or something that does that thing (a builder). Come up with a list of doing words with your child that can be changed by adding an -er at the end.

Can your child consistently:

  • Understand and use words from these themes:
    • daily routines (e.g., breakfast, lunch, supper, snack)
    • playground (e.g., to swing, to slide, to climb, to skip)
    • travel (e.g., car, truck boat, airplane).
  • Use a different voice to ask questions and make comments.
  • Understand and use the comparative (-er).

Did you know?

Routine and predictability play an important role in reducing a child’s stress and nurturing resilience (the ability to cope during challenges times). You are supporting your child’s readiness to learn by having a simple daily routine for sleep, meals, play and story-time.