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Language - Set 9

Activities:

Let’s learn to understand and use words from these themes:

    • Nature (e.g., wind, water, fire, earth)
    • Body (e.g., shoulder, elbow, knee, ankle)
    • Five senses (e.g., to see, to hear, to smell, to taste, to touch)
  • Ask your child for examples of things he or she can hear, see, touch, taste and smell. Have everyday conversations or experiments where you talk about how different things taste, sound, feel, or smell.

Let’s learn to identify the characters of a story.

  • After reading a book, ask your child to name the characters in the story and pick his or her favourite one. Ask why it is his or her favourite.
  • Characters are the people doing things in a story (or sometimes the animals or objects who the author makes think or act like people).

Let’s learn to tell stories with a logical sequence, in a group and one-on-one.

  • After reading a story together, ask questions about what happened first, second, third and last. Ask your child to imagine what would happen if the order was changed. Ask if the story would still make sense.

Can your child consistently:

  • Understand and use words from these themes:
    • nature (e.g., wind, water, fire, earth)
    • body (e.g., shoulder, elbow, knee, ankle)
    • five senses (e.g., to see, to hear, to smell, to taste, to touch)
  • Identify the characters of a story.
  • Tell stories with a logical sequence, in a group and one-on-one.

Did you know?

Expressive language requires children to draw words from their mental dictionary (known words) and use them to convey meaning to others. As children develop their expressive language skills, they begin with short phrases and eventually use full sentences. Writing is the analogue of reading comprehension in that it requires one to use their expressive language skills and convey the information in print.

Read at Home Video:

Blackflies:

Diary of a Worm: