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Language - Set 10

Activities:

Let’s learn to understand and use words from these themes:

    • Nature (e.g., cloud, river, rainbow, storm)
    • Animals (e.g., salmon, caribou, wolf, eagle)
    • Animal body parts (e.g., claw, antler, scales, beak)
  • Read a book about animals and then discuss how their body parts are sometimes similar to ours but have different names (e.g., paw and hand; fur and hair), while some body parts are very different than ours (e.g., hoof, scales). Ask your child what animal body part he or she would like to have and why.

Let’s learn to connect new vocabulary to prior knowledge.

  • When coming upon an unfamiliar word while reading a book, work together to try to figure out its meaning. You can look up the word in another book or find a connection with your child’s world. For example, for the word birch, explain that it’s a hardwood tree with white bark that peels off.

Let’s learn to identify the settings and moral of a story.

  • After reading a book, ask your child if he or she learned a lesson from the story and what it was. Talk about what a moral is as well as the morals of other stories.

Can your child consistently:

  • Understand and use words from these themes:
    • nature (e.g., cloud, river, rainbow, storm)
    • animals (e.g., salmon, caribou, wolf, eagle)
    • animal body parts (e.g., claw, antler, scales, beak)
  • Connect new vocabulary to prior knowledge.
  • Identify the settings and moral of a story.

Did you know?

When you encounter a word that you don’t think your child is familiar with, take a moment to ask them what they think the word means before telling them the answer. This takes advantage of something called ‘desirable difficulty’ or ‘productive failure’. The extra effort it takes your child to attempt to answer a question he or she doesn’t already readily know the answer to will make what they learn easier to remember.

Read at Home Video:

What if you had animal feet: