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Code - Set 4

Activities:

Let’s learn to use uppercase and lowercase letters.

  • Ask your child to find uppercase letters (e.g., F, M, A) and lowercase letters in a book (e.g., f, m, a). See if he or she can figure out when each one is used (e.g., uppercase letters are used at the beginning of sentences and as the first letter of people’s names).
  • Children often find it easier to learn uppercase letters first, and lowercase letters later. Lowercase letters are more common in print, so teachers tend to give these letter forms more focus.

Let’s learn to name, make the sound for and print the letters: Ff, Tt, Mm, Pp, Nn, Ss, Aa and Oo.

  • Practice naming, making the sound for and printing the letters: Ff, Tt, Mm, Pp, Nn, Ss, Aa and Oo.
  • Use letter magnets, white boards, or small pieces of paper to put the letters together into words like pan, mat, and top, and help your child sound them out.

Let’s learn to generate words that have the same initial sound as another word.

  • Make a list of words that start with the same sound as the first sound in your child’s name (e.g., for Shawn: shave, share, shin, shine, shut).
  • This is a fun game to play throughout the day. Try to come up with words that have the same sound as different objects or activities you come across during the day.

Can your child consistently:

  • Use uppercase and lowercase letters.
  • Name, make the sound for and print the letters: Ff, Tt, Mm, Pp, Nn, Ss, Aa and Oo.
  • Generate words that have the same initial sound as another word.

Did you know?

There are 44 distinct sounds (phonemes) in the English language, including the most common sound associated with each letter of the alphabet. Listen and learn about them here.