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Code - Set 14

Activities:

Let’s learn to sound out and spell words with the letter combinations: wh, er, igh and ol.

  • Compare words that start with “w” (e.g., wait and walk) and “wh” (e.g., whale and whiff). Name “w” and “wh” words and see if your child can sort them in the right category.

Let’s learn to recognize and sound out words with the soft c (dance) and g (page), as well as the long y sounds as in try and bunny.

  • Write words starting with “c” and “g” on pieces of paper (e.g., cell, carrot, cot, grub, gel and golf). Turn them over and mix them up. Ask your child to pick one and tell you if the first sound is soft (i.e., s sound for “c” as in celery and j sound for “g” as in gym) or hard (i.e., k sound for “c” as in corn and g sound for “g” as in gopher). If he or she says the correct answer, he or she gets to keep the piece of paper. If not, you get to keep it.

Let’s learn to read correctly at least 40 words per minute in a text with good expression.

  • Tell your child stories about your parents and grandparents. Encourage him or her to ask questions about your parents or childhood, then write their own story. Have them read their story aloud to you or a family member.

Can your child consistently:

  • Sound out and spell words with the letter combinations: wh, er, igh and ol.
  • Recognize and sound out words with the soft c (dance) and g (page), as well as the long y sounds as in try and bunny.
  • Read correctly at least 40 words per minute in a text with good expression.

Did you know?

Repetition and practice spaced across several days and weeks is essential for children to retain learning. Try to make reading practice fun and part of your family’s every-day routine. A reading log or incentive chart can increase motivation if your child’s interest in waning. As adults it’s easy to forget all of the skills involved in learning to read and underestimate the time and practice it takes to become a proficient reader.